US EPA plans to add 16 chemicals to toxics release inventory

06 April 2010 20:02  [Source: ICIS news]

TORONTO (ICIS news)--The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) plans to add 16 chemicals to its Toxics Release Inventory (TRI) list of reportable chemicals, the first expansion of the programme in over a decade, it said on Tuesday.

The chemicals the EPA proposed to be added to the list included furan, isoprene, vinyl fluoride, glycidol, methyleugenol, o-nitroanisole, nitromethane, phenolphthalein, tetrafluoroethylene, tetranitromethane, 1-amino-2,4-dibromoanthraquinone, and 2,2-bis(bromomethyl)-1,3-propanediol, it said.

Also included were 1,6-dinitropyrene, 1,8-dinitropyrene, 6-nitrochrysene and 4-nitropyrene, which were being proposed for addition to the TRI under the polycyclic aromatic compounds (PACs) category, the agency said.

That category included chemicals that were persistent, bioaccumulative, toxic (PBT) and were likely to remain in the environment for a very long time, it added.

The purpose of the proposed additions was to inform the public about chemical releases in their communities and to provide the government with information for research and potential development of regulations, the agency said.

The EPA said it would accept public comments on the proposal for 60 days after it appeared in the Federal Register.

Further details about the 16 chemicals are available on the EPA’s website.

The TRI, established as part of the US Emergency Planning and Community Right To Know Act (EPCRA) of 1986, contains information on nearly 650 chemicals and chemical groups from about 22,000 industrial facilities throughout the US.

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By: Stefan Baumgarten
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