What I Want To Know in H2 – Part Two

Garbage out, garbage in

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Source of Picture: The Daily Telegraph

Here goes for the second part of this series.

Is there anybody out there who can help?

How will the ongoing availability of recycled material affect the pricing power of virgin resins? (We have the data to show that imports of scrap polyethylene (PE) and polypropylene (PP) fell in Nov-Feb, but have since heard anecdotal evidence that they have increased again. If so why?

Questions worth asking on recycling:
a.) Has there been a recovery in availability of recycled material? If so why? Is this because of stronger demand in the West for durable consumer goods wrapped in plastics, which are recycled and sent back to China?
b.) And/or is this the result of the rise in virgin resins since March. Has this resulted in a much harder global search for and new sourcing of the scrap material that is available?
c.) And/or has there been a relaxation in the govt regulations covering recycled material that’s made imports easier?
d.) If recycled material is now more readily available, has this set a new pricing cap on virgin resins? At what price is it now economic for converters to switch to recycled material?
e.) Has the rise in virgin resins also led to more fillers being used again?
f.) What’s the current state of distribution networks for recycled material? We have heard that lots of traders in recycled material went bust during the big price collapse last year as they were left holding high stocks of material that was more expensive than virgin resin. We also understand that remaining traders in recycled material were interested in trading in virgin plastics in Jan-May because the profits were greater. A further factor to consider might be that the Dalian Commodity Exchange (where linear-low density PE and polyvinyl chloride futures are traded – see later notes) is a lot quicker and less risky way of making money than trading in scrap. This might have also hampered the rebuilding of the scrap-supplier network
g.) We have focused on China. Is recycling also a major issue outside China?

All the questions above could equally apply to some of the other polymers. PS is hard to recycle, but what about the impact on, say, PET resin water bottles? We are not sure if this has even been economic, but could this be a factor behind the lack of an automatic recycling price cap down the fibres chain – or any other chains for that matter?

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