Could Moringa be the new Jatropha?

It is not that I’m bored by Jatropha yet, in the same way that I’m bored by some of the feverishness about corn ethanol, but there is another protential tropical biofuel from a tree called Moringa. Wikipedia sugests the trees could produce 112-185 gal/acre/year. The oil contains 65-75% oleic acids.

Thanks for the tip David!

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8 Responses to Could Moringa be the new Jatropha?

  1. Carlos Eduardo 19 January, 2009 at 4:10 pm #

    The brazilian magazine about biodiesel made a very nice report about the moringa tree on biodiesel (brazilian native plant):

    http://www.biodieselbr.com/revista/008/moringa.htm

    The article present very nice insights about this feedstock

  2. Pradeep 19 January, 2009 at 5:38 pm #

    Not quite…
    “…The oil contains 65-75% oleic acids and, unlike Jatropha oil, is beneficial for both humans and fuel…”
    The good thing is that it does not require much resources for cultivation. In southern India, Moringa “drumsticks” are used as ingredients in a lentil soup. This is one food use for the fruit I know of.

  3. Simon Robinson 21 January, 2009 at 10:23 am #

    Hey Carlos, good to hear from you. I’ll check out the website Simon

  4. David B. Benson 22 January, 2009 at 2:31 am #

    How does the production compare to Jatropha?

  5. Stephen Kirlew 24 January, 2009 at 8:35 pm #

    In my opinion Moringa is better to be used as a food and not a bio fuel. As it is the most nutrient rich plant/tree in the world and grows in very arrid parts of the world it can greatly help 3rd world malnutrition. I can understand why it might be used as a bio fuel because it can grow to full size within 2 years but it has some seriously amazing health benefits!

  6. mohned abdoun 1 February, 2009 at 6:37 pm #

    i do agree with MrKIRLEW about the health benefits of moringa i planted moringa trees last january by july it produced about 400 drumsticks and it still flowering and producing drumsticks each tree gave a biofbout 600 drumsticks iam for using moringa for food fodder and biofuel it is definitly better than jatropha thank you M.Ahmed

  7. Simon Robinson 2 February, 2009 at 10:37 am #

    looks like the Moringa situation is more complex than I first imagined. Isn’t that typical of all the proposed solutions for biofuels?

  8. Stephen Kirlew 17 May, 2009 at 1:11 pm #

    Have a look at http://www.treesforlife.org. They have alot of great information and resources about the humaitarian benefits of Moringa in third world countries. It’s also gaining popularity in the west as a super food and the oil as a cosmetic (used in the Body Shop).

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