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BRIJ auto sales head in different directions

There has been a lot of wishful thinking over the past 15 years about the BRIC countries (Brazil, Russia, India and China).  The experts told us they were all going to become middle class overnight, and ensure that global growth continued to motor, even as the West slowed. Reality has proved rather different, of course.  This makes […]

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Vast amounts of stimulus have not made China “middle class”

Debt can’t make a country middle-class overnight.  Even a massive amount of debt can’t achieve this.  Even the largest amount of debt in history can’t do this.  China’s experience since 2007, when it increased debt four-fold, proves this. As McKinsey have reported, China increased its debt from $7tn in 2007 to $28tn by the middle of […]

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54000 millionaires needed to buy new London apartments

‘Nothing succeeds like excess’.  That seems to be the motto of London property developers at the moment.  According to researchers LonRes, developers are currently building or planning the staggering total of 54000 new luxury homes in central London. These will all be offered at prices of £1m ($1.5m) and higher, according to the Financial Times.  Yet just 3900 […]

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BMW says China’s auto sales are heading into a New Normal

Its amazing what a lending bubble can do in the short-term, as the above chart shows.  It updates my August post for the Financial Times, and highlights the astonishing rise in China’s bank lending since 2008 on the x-axis, and the remarkable rise in auto sales on the y-axis. Official data shows average disposable income last […]

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US auto sales, housing starts, will be hit by oil price collapse

The best view is always from the top of the mountain.  That’s probably why the outlook seems so promising for US auto and housing markets.  Both appear to be doing well on the surface, but dig a little deeper and concerns soon emerge. The chart above demonstrates the point, updating the data from my July post […]

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Falling cotton/polyester prices create ‘deflation shock’ for consumers

Cotton prices appear to be collapsing again due to the surpluses created by central bank stimulus policies since 2009.  As the chart shows, these had initially caused prices to soar to levels not seen since the American Civil War: They reached 230c/lb in March 2011, nearly double the post-1982 peak of 117c/lb in May 1995 (blue […]

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G7 births in 2013 equal Great Depression year of 1933

In 2013, there were fewer births in the G7 countries – responsible for nearly 50% of the global economy – than in any year since the Great Depression year of 1933.* As the chart also shows, 1933 was an exception.  Births bounced back immediately afterwards.  But the low figure in 2013 is part of the declining trend seen since […]

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Chart of the Year – China’s auto sales bubble begins to burst

‘How China fooled the world’ was the subject of an excellent BBC documentary early in 2014 by senior editor, Robert Peston.  The BBC headline was as follows: “Now, Peston reveals what has actually happened inside China since the economic collapse in the west in 2008. It is a story of spending and investment on a scale never […]

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FT

Sanitation is the greatest challenge facing Modi

The Financial Times has kindly printed my letter, commenting on their editorial about Premier Modi’s economic policies in India. Sir, Your editorial “India’s Modi should act more decisively in 2015” (December 24) has too limited a view of the policies required to generate growth in India’s economy. With gross domestic product per capita of about […]

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US home ownership back at 1995 level as decline continues

  Conventional wisdom seemed to think the US housing report was positive this week.  But analysis of the data makes it hard to see why. One confusion comes from media use of the ‘seasonally adjusted’ number.  But why do we need an adjustment, when we have data going back to 1959?  It simply creates more potential for error.  […]

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