Archive | July, 2008

Cosmetic safety in question. Again.

No matter how safe or thoroughly tested cosmetic ingredients are, there’s always one (or two or more) that will always be put into question. Just in time for the summer, the Environmental Working Group claimed that out of nearly 1,000 sunscreen products in the US market, four out of five offer inadequate protection from the […]

Continue Reading

Weekly News Roundup

This week saw a lot of news from the biofuel sector, which I left to my co-blogger Simon Robinson to dissect and analyze. Congratulations as well to Simon for reaching his 1000th post! To catch up (my fourth post today), here’s our green roundup covering from superfruits to clean coal. More solar power in Nevada […]

Continue Reading

More green for less work days

Some companies in Massachusetts are experimenting on having shorter work days in order to save energy and fuel costs, according to this article from Boston Globe. Several government agencies in Sudbury, Winchester, and Concord, New Hampshire, already started some employees on trial four-day workweeks. Boston Globe reported that agencies in Newburyport and Westport are considering […]

Continue Reading

What’s today’s air forecast in China?

In China, not only do you need forecasts for weather, pollen, UV rays, and wind, you also need to monitor air pollution forecasts especially with the incoming Summer Olympic Games in Beijing. Starting July 20, car traffic was restricted in the city in order to to take 50 percent of Beijing’s 3,5 million vehicles off […]

Continue Reading

Top of the Scrap

Growing up, I used to collect metal scraps (mostly copper and aluminum) from the neighborhood motor shops with my street pals and then sell them to the highest recycler bidder via door to door (since Ebay is not yet around). Pity I didn’t have the entrepreneurial foresight to make it as a business or I […]

Continue Reading

EPA gets pesticide lawsuit

I wonder how many lawsuits the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) gets each week? I just got this press release from the group Earthjustice, and they, among a coalition of farmworkers, public health, and environmental groups, filed a lawsuit today against the EPA to stop the use of organochlorine pesticide endosulfan. The coalition said that […]

Continue Reading

EU bans seal furs

I admit this news is not greatly connected to the chemical industry (except maybe a slight demand decline for dyes and other textile materials) but I can’t resist posting it. The Fur Institute of Canada (FIC) is bristling at yesterday’s European Union proposal to ban the import of seal products, stating that Canada has overly […]

Continue Reading

Enter the dead zones

The volume of hypoxic zones, also called “dead zones”, in the Gulf of Mexico and Chesapeake Bay are expected to be record-setting this summer according to a University of Michigan researcher. Hypoxia refers to the loss of oxygen in water, which then leads to unsustainable conditions for aquatic plants and animals. The widening of Gulf […]

Continue Reading

Of mice and men

What’s the difference between mice and men? The difference, according to the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA), is that people metabolize (when taken in tolerable dosage)and excrete bisphenol-A far more quickly than rodents. The EFSA released an update today and reaffirmed that people are safe from the levels of BPA exposure which may be present […]

Continue Reading

Solar updates

ICIS Chemical Business, the magazine I work for, recently published two very nice articles about the photovoltaics market. According to Dede Williams, Germany is facing feedstock shortages and competition from cheaper regions, while Ed Zwirn reported a global overview of the industry. And with that introduction, here are more solar news accumulating in my soon-to-post […]

Continue Reading