Turning the globe green

05 February 2007 00:00  [Source: ICB]

Several initiatives have won near-global backing in recent years, including the Kyoto Protocol and the Stockholm Convention on Persistent Organic Pollutants, but there are still major nations that stand aside from these important treaties

JOHN BAKER/LONDON

ENVIRONMENTAL CONCERNS frequently know no boundaries, so it is important that concerted international action is taken to tackle them.

The United Nations has led the way with the Kyoto Protocol, the Stockholm Convention as well as the Rotterdam Convention on Prior Informed Consent.

But the US, the country with the largest GDP and the greatest emissions of greenhouse gases, has implemented none of these agreements. And without its involvment, global warming will be hard to tackle effectively. What happens post-Kyoto will be crucial for the planet.

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Sources: Data in boxes from United Nations, BTM Consult, the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center and BP.

UK
GDP, 2005, $bn 2,199
Wind turbine capacity, 2005, MW 1,336
Primary energy consumption, 2005, m tonnes oil equivalent, 227
Carbon emissions, 2003, '000 tonnes of carbon, 152,460
Per capita carbon emissions, 2003, tonnes carbon/person, 2.56

GERMANY
GDP, 2005, $bn 2,795
Wind turbine capacity, 2005, MW 18,445
Primary energy consumption, 2005, m tonnes oil equivalent, 324
Carbon emissions, 2003, '000 tonnes of carbon, 219,776
Per capita carbon emissions, 2003, tonnes carbon/person, 2.66

RUSSIA
GDP, 2005, $bn 766
Wind turbine capacity, 2005, MW n/a
Primary energy consumption, 2005, m tonnes oil equivalent, 680
Carbon emissions, 2003, '000 tonnes of carbon, 407,593
Per capita carbon emissions, 2003, tonnes carbon/person, 2.85

FRANCE
GDP, 2005, $bn 2,127
Wind turbine capacity, 2005, MW 775
Primary energy consumption, 2005, m tonnes oil equivalent, 262
Carbon emissions, 2003, '000 tonnes of carbon, 102,065
Per capita carbon emissions, 2003, tonnes carbon/person,1.70

US
GDP, 2005, $bn 12,456
Wind turbine capacity, 2005, MW 9,181
Primary energy consumption, 2005, m tonnes oil equivalent, 2,337
Carbon emissions, 2003, '000 tonnes of carbon, 1,580,175
Per capita carbon emissions, 2003, tonnes carbon/person, 5.43

JAPAN
GDP, 2005, $bn 4,559
Wind turbine capacity, 2005, MW 1,159
Primary energy consumption, 2005, m tonnes oil equivalent, 525
Carbon emissions, 2003, '000 tonnes of carbon, 336,142
Per capita carbon emissions, 2003, tonnes carbon/person, 2.74

BRAZIL
GDP, 2005, $bn 800
Wind turbine capacity, 2005, MW 31
Primary energy consumption, 2005, m tonnes oil equivalent, 195
Carbon emissions, 2003, '000 tonnes of carbon, 81,445
Per capita carbon emissions, 2003, tonnes carbon/person, 0.47

INDIA
GDP, 2005, $bn 801
Wind turbine capacity, 2005, MW 4,253
Primary energy consumption, 2005, m tonnes oil equivalent, 387
Carbon emissions, 2003, '000 tonnes of carbon, 347,577
Per capita carbon emissions, 2003, tonnes carbon/person, 0.33

CHINA

GDP, 2005, $bn 1,982
Wind turbine capacity, 2005, MW 1,264
Primary energy consumption, 2005, m tonnes oil equivalent, 1,554
Carbon emissions, 2003, '000 tonnes of carbon, 1,131,175
Per capita carbon emissions, 2003, tonnes carbon/person, 0.86

AUSTRALIA
GDP, 2005, $bn 710
Wind turbine capacity, 2005, MW 717
Primary energy consumption, 2005, m tonnes oil equivalent, 119
Carbon emissions, 2003, '000 tonnes of carbon, 96,657
Per capita carbon emissions, 2003, tonnes carbon/person, 4.85

For a high resolution pdf of a world map showing treaties and emissions, please contact csc@icis.com

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