PetroChina’s safety spending surges in 2006

12 April 2007 08:28  [Source: ICIS news]

SINGAPORE (ICIS news)--PetroChina increased its spending on environmental and safety measures last year in the wake of the Songhua river pollution disaster in 2005, statistics from a company report showed late on Wednesday.

 

The China-based major spent yuan (CNY)13.2bn ($1.7bn) in 2006 compared with a total of CNY17.85bn in the five years prior to that.

 

Out of this amount, CNY2.1bn was spent on building and improving three-level water pollution prevention and control projects, it said in its first corporate social responsibility report.

 

These facilities included a number of accident treatment pools and buffering pools which could collect and treat sewage water should another accident occur, it added.

 

In late 2005, subsidiary Jilin Petrochemical spilt benzene into the Songhua river when its aniline unit exploded. The accident polluted drinking water, affecting millions of people in northeast China and Russia.

 

The number of fatal accidents and injuries among workers at the Chinese major fell by 25% and 12% respectively in 2006 compared with a year ago, it said.

 

“However, we regret to see three major accidents happened and 21 lives [were] lost,” it added.

 

PetroChina reduced the oil-related waste and chemical on demand (COD) content in its waste water by 7.2% and 4.9% to 1,131 tonnes and 22,264 tonnes respectively in 2006.

 

On the green energy front, the company had started building a pilot biodiesel unit in Nanchong, Sichuan province, and biofuel raw material bases in Yunnan and Sichuan provinces, it said, but did not provide further details.

 

($1=CNY7.73)

 

 


By: Florence Tan
+65 6780 4359



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