Ethylene vinyl acetate (EVA)

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Discover the factors influencing ethylene vinyl acetate (EVA) markets

Ethylene vinyl acetate (EVA) has a wide range of foaming and packaging applications. It can also be used in hoses and tubes, adhesives, wire and cable insulation, as a coating for heat sealing and for encapsulation in solar cells, according to the ratio of ethylene to VA.

With coverage of Asia-Pacific, Europe and the US, alongside multiple Chinese quotes, ICIS became the first company to provide global EVA pricing in 2022. Gain an in-depth, comprehensive view of the EVA market and its drivers, including a weekly outlook for polyethylene (PE), acetic acid and vinyl acetate monomer (VAM).

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Ethylene vinyl acetate (EVA) news

INSIGHT: Asia freight rates stay elevated on heavy congestion at key ports

SINGAPORE (ICIS)–Ocean container freight rates in Asia are expected to remain high in the near term amid persistent congestion at key ports in the region, particularly Singapore. Peak demand season, capacity issues continue to push up rates Singapore port wait times reduced, but challenges remain ASEAN Express offers faster rail alternative to sea freight The Drewry World Container Index (WCI) edged up 1% to $5,901 per forty-foot equivalent unit (FEU) for the week ending 11 July, with the rate of increase easing from a double-digit pace se in recent weeks. The Shanghai Containerized Freight Index (SCFI), which measures spot rates for shipping containers from Shanghai to major global ports, meanwhile, dipped 1% week on week to 3,674.86 points in the week ending 12 July. The convergence of seasonal peak demand and strained capacity as commercial vessels continued to avoid the Red Sea and Suez Canal, are expected to keep shipping costs firm in the near term for container routes globally, said Judah Levine, the head of research at online freight shipping marketplace and platform provider Freightos. According to supply chain advisors Drewry, ocean freight rates are expected to remain high until the end of the peak season, which typically falls between August to October each year. SINGAPORE CONGESTION EASING In Singapore, the world's second-largest port and the largest transshipment hub connecting Asia and the west, the average wait time to berth has been "reduced to two days or under", port operator PSA Singapore said in a statement on 10 July. This compares to waiting times up to seven days for a berth in the port of Singapore in late May this year, according to logistics data group Linerlytica. Singapore has experienced high berth demand and unscheduled vessel arrivals since the start of 2024, leading to increased waiting times despite utilizing all available berths, PSA said. PSA has since "significantly ramped up its capabilities to support increased activity and mitigate the impact of global supply chain disruptions since the beginning of 2024". However, the PSA warned that “the Red Sea crisis has significantly disrupted global shipping and trade and we anticipate this challenging situation to persist for a prolonged period, potentially extending port congestion from Asia to Europe”. For chemical tankers, shipping brokers have reported varying degrees of congestion and delays at Singapore ports. A broker involved in bio-chemicals and clean petroleum product (CPP) trades noted congestion at all terminals with delays of at least one week. A tanker carrying methyl acetate (MEAC) was facing a two-week delay in discharging cargoes at a key terminal in Jurong Island, another broker said. Jurong Island is Singapore’s petrochemical hub. A third broker indicated that delays in unloading and loading of cargoes at Singapore ports were generally measured in days rather than weeks. A Singapore-based acrylates producer was having difficulties securing vessel space, as shipping companies were bypassing the congested port. This congestion has also spilled over into Malaysia, impacting customers in both countries which are now experiencing delays of up to a week for July shipments. Overall port congestion levels in Malaysia have been reduced, but berthing delays remain at five days at Port Klang, while Tanjung Pelepas has limited delays, Linerlytica said in an update on 10 July. In India, heavy congestion is also reported at Colombo port, resulting in backlogs and delays, with adverse weather conditions around the Cape of Good Hope compounding the situation, causing further delays, according to global digital freight forwarder Zencargo in a note on 15 July. Vessels are increasingly navigating around the Cape of Good Hope to avoid the heightened risks in the Red Sea and Suez Canal due to escalating Houthi attacks since November 2023, opting for a longer-but-safer route despite the added time and costs. "The market from the Indian subcontinent to Europe is experiencing significant disruptions," it said. "Carriers have stopped accepting bookings from South India for Europe due to heavy congestion in Colombo, causing a minimum delay of three weeks in transshipment. Carriers are only quoting on spot rates due to the tight space situation​." Historically, Colombo has handled a substantial portion of India’s containerized exports and imports due to insufficient direct line-haul connections from the country’s east coast ports, according to Zencargo. However, recent months have seen an unusual surge in volumes, exacerbated by vessel diversions linked to Red Sea shipping disruptions, with ships languishing for over five days before securing a berth, it said. In China, port delays have worsened in the week to 10 July after recent improvements due to bunching of vessel arrivals, with wait times of up to four days in Shanghai and up to two days in Ningbo, Linerlytica added. China is also set to continue grappling with rising container prices and leasing rates in July, according to Haoze Lou, a member of the broker team at online shipping container leasing firm Container xChange. Scarcity of available slots for China-Europe and China-US routes has intensified, prompting offline suppliers to offer competitive prices to attract customers, Lou said. "In June, we've observed a continued rise in container prices in China, impacting both trading and leasing activities," he said, adding that a rebound is expected over the next month as slot availability tightens again. CONTAINER RATES HINGES ON CONSUMER DEMAND The outlook for the container trading and leasing market in the second half of 2024 hinges on a revival in consumer demand but faces uncertainties due to geopolitical disruptions and potential labor unrest, according to Container xChange. Continued Houthi attacks threaten supply chains, while potential labor issues in US ports could further disrupt operations, it said. "However, if the current market conditions persist without major changes, we expect container rates to ease,” Container xChange noted. “This reduction in rates could trigger an uptick in container buyer activity, as the buyer side is currently waiting for prices to decline before resuming trading and leasing activities." RAIL OPTIONS OPEN UP FOR CHINA-SE ASIA ROUTE The successful inaugural trips of the ASEAN Express – a new cargo rail service connecting Malaysia, Thailand, Laos, and China – highlight its potential as a faster and more efficient alternative to traditional ocean freight as it connects new trade routes and inland ports across Asia. This includes the Kontena Nasional Inland Clearance Depot in Selangor, Malaysia; Latkrabang Inland Port in Thailand; and the Thanaleng Dry Port in Laos, which connects to a railway terminal in Chongqing, southwest China. The first ASEAN Express cargo train successfully completed a round trip between Malaysia and China on 11 July, carrying electronic appliances and agricultural products, marking a milestone in regional trade connectivity which could boost trade of petrochemical end-products. The recently launched cargo rail service has been met with optimism by Asian recyclers, though immediate impact is expected to be limited. While the service directly benefits buyers and sellers in China, Malaysia, Thailand, and Laos, recyclers in Taiwan, Indonesia, and Vietnam anticipate primarily using ships, potentially freeing up shipping capacity and alleviating tightness in vessel and container space. This new service significantly reduces transit time compared to sea freight, taking just under 14 days compared with up to three weeks by sea. "This service will provide smoother and more efficient goods flow throughout the region as well as enhance rail cargo transport capacity while reducing logistics costs by an estimated 20% from current market rates," Malaysian transport minister Loke Siew Fook said in a speech at the flag-off ceremony for the new rail service on 27 June. "The shorter transport times are also expected to open up new markets, with the agricultural sector in particular to benefit by allowing perishable products to be transported more quickly by rail," he added. Insight article by Nurluqman Suratman Additional reporting by Hwee Hwee Tan, Corey Chew, Arianne Perez and Ai Teng Lim Thumbnail image: At the Keppel and Brani port terminals in Singapore, 15 June 2024 (By Joseph Nair/NurPhoto/Shutterstock)

17-Jul-2024

Europe top stories: weekly summary

LONDON (ICIS)–Here are some of the top stories from ICIS Europe for the week ended 12 July. Europe ethylene spot prices turn firmer on demand, feedstock, looming cracker turnarounds European ethylene spot prices have firmed week on week on the back of better-than-expected demand amid higher feedstock values and an increasing focus on upcoming planned cracker maintenance outages. Global crude demand slows in Q2, China consumption contracts – IEA Global crude oil demand slumped to 710,000 bbl/day in Q2 2024 as China’s post-pandemic economic rebound ran its course, the International Energy Agency (IEA) said on Thursday. Storm Beryl damage, economic loss to US estimated at $28-32 billion Total damage and economic loss in the US from Storm Beryl amounted to $28-32 billion, according to meteorology firm AccuWeather. Europe chemicals players expect construction demand to remain sluggish until H1 2025 Chemicals players in Europe do not expect any substantial recovery from the building and construction industry until the first half of 2025 at least. Flooding to continue across central US as Beryl moves inland Flash flooding is expected as Storm Beryl continues to progress across the central US, with blackouts and logistic shutdowns seen in parts of Texas. ‘Life-threatening’ storm surge in Texas as Hurricane Beryl makes US landfall Hurricane Beryl has made landfall in eastern Texas and looks set to batter parts of the state’s key petrochemicals production hubs, with the US National Hurricane Center (NHC) warning of a life-threatening storm surge on Monday.

15-Jul-2024

Asia top stories – weekly summary

SINGAPORE (ICIS)–Here are the top stories from ICIS News Asia and the Middle East for the week ended 12 July 2024. OUTLOOK: Asia naphtha market braces for supply uncertainties By Li Peng Seng 12-Jul-24 12:00 SINGAPORE (ICIS)–Asia’s naphtha market sentiment is expected to be choppy in the short term due to a lack of clarity on arbitrage supplies against volatile demand. OUTLOOK: Asia EVA market loses shine as demand from PV sector lags By Helen Lee 11-Jul-24 11:25 SINGAPORE (ICIS)–Demand for ethylene vinyl acetate (EVA) from China’s photovoltaic (PV) industry is likely to remain lackluster amid an oversupply in the entire industry chain. PODCAST: China to accelerate hydrogen development via energy law By Patricia Tao 10-Jul-24 11:25 SINGAPORE (ICIS)–China's recent decision to include hydrogen in its draft national energy law signals a transformative shift in the country's energy landscape. China EV giant BYD to invest $1 billion in Turkey production plant By Nurluqman Suratman 09-Jul-24 15:24 SINGAPORE (ICIS)–Chinese electric vehicle (EV) giant BYD has agreed to invest $1 billion to set up a manufacturing plant in Turkey which will produce up to 150,000 vehicles per year. PODCAST: Asia recycling market sees increased interest in pyrolysis By Damini Dabholkar 09-Jul-24 11:17 SINGAPORE (ICIS)–Market players in Asia are increasingly becoming more interested in the use of pyrolysis oil as fuel. OUTLOOK: SE Asia PE to see some demand recovery in H2, challenges persist By Izham Ahmad 09-Jul-24 15:07 SINGAPORE (ICIS)–The southeast Asian polyethylene (PE) market is expected to face modest demand recovery in the second half (H2) of the year, but this is likely to be negated by increased supply and the threat of high freight costs affecting import shipments.

15-Jul-2024

Europe ethylene spot prices turn firmer on demand, feedstock, looming cracker turnarounds

LONDON (ICIS)–European ethylene spot prices have firmed week on week on the back of better-than-expected demand amid higher feedstock values and an increasing focus on upcoming planned cracker maintenance outages. Spot deals this week have been reported at discounts of 32-35% on the pipeline, prior deals had been at discounts of around 38-39%. Producers say they have received several requests for additional volume offtakes in July. This is being attributed to a combination of factors: Improved sentiment from domestic PVC players following the imposition of tariffs on imports ex-Egypt and the US Continued high container freight rates which are restricting some derivative imports Recent hurricane-related production and logistics disruptions ex-US Firmer month-on-month naphtha values which is likely to drive discussions for the August contract reference price settlement Planned cracker maintenance due to get underway from September particularly that due in Germany with alternative supply flexibility likely to be limited at that time due to pressure issues on the ARG pipeline. With crackers having been run at rates closely aligned with contractual demand – still very much below normal albeit better than in 2023 – there is not too much flexibility for additional volumes at short notice. “Many will have assumed that ethylene supply would always be plentiful,” a source said, “and now they find that it is not the case.” Cracker operators have avoided as far as possible marginal tonne production as spot appetite has been extremely low unless at deep discounts to the prevailing contract price. Crackers are underutilised, so in theory, there is space to ramp up. But with August around the corner and few indications at this stage how long this better-than-expected demand will be sustained, sources assume producers will be reluctant to ramp up production in July. Thumbnail photo: Flooding in Houston, Texas, in the wake of Hurricane Beryl on 8 July 2024, one of the causes of firming ethylene prices. Source: Carlos Ramirez/EPA-EFE/Shutterstock

12-Jul-2024

PODCAST: US Gulf Coast chemicals must prepare for more persistent disruption

BARCELONA (ICIS)–Climate change and warming oceans mean that the US Gulf Coast chemical sector will have to adapt to more frequent weather events such as Hurricane Beryl. Gulf Coast area where Hurricane Beryl made landfall houses 13m tonnes, 29% of US ethylene production capacity Beryl is earliest Category five hurricane on record; busy season forecast Warming oceans mean there may be double the number of severe hurricanes Energy, chemical industries must adapt to cope with more weather events Move towards net zero carbon gives opportunity to relocate plants, infrastructure In this Think Tank podcast, Will Beacham interviews ICIS Business Solutions Group senior executive Nigel Davis and Paul Hodges, chairman of New Normal Consulting. Editor’s note: This podcast is an opinion piece. The views expressed are those of the presenter and interviewees, and do not necessarily represent those of ICIS. Read the latest issue of ICIS Chemical Business. Read Paul Hodges and John Richardson's ICIS blogs.

09-Jul-2024

Asia top stories – weekly summary

SINGAPORE (ICIS)–Here are the top stories from ICIS News Asia and the Middle East for the week ended 5 July 2024. OUTLOOK: Snug import supply supports Asia MEG amid slowing demand By Judith Wang 03-Jul-24 11:52 SINGAPORE (ICIS)–Monoethylene glycol (MEG) import supply in Asia for July is expected to stay snug in the near term, while demand looks set to slow down. INSIGHT: Methanol or ethylene, that is the question for China By Doris He 02-Jul-24 17:00 SINGAPORE (ICIS)–China’s methanol-to-olefins (MTO) industry has always been a focus of attention among methanol market players, as it accounts for half of overall demand. More attention has recently been shifted to ethylene, from the overall margins of a typical MTO plant in coastal regions. OUTLOOK: Asia nylon markets may slow down in H2 2024 on lengthened supply By Charmaine Lim 01-Jul-24 14:40 SINGAPORE (ICIS)–Nylon markets in Asia are expected to slow in H2 2024 compared to the first half of the year as the upcoming seasonal lull in Q3 approaches, with new capacities planned to start up in China this year. S Korea antidumping probe on China SM extends to Sept, discussions and hearings ongoing By Luffy Wu 01-Jul-24 15:22 SINGAPORE (ICIS)–The Korea Trade Commission is continuing with its anti-dumping probe against styrene monomer (SM) imports from China, with some discussions and hearings between the government and market players heard ongoing. PODCAST: China oxo-alcohols to face supply-demand pressure, new capacity to be a focus By Claire Gao 01-Jul-24 19:24 SINGAPORE (ICIS)–In this podcast, ICIS analyst Claire Gao explores the oxo-alcohols market overview and outlook. OUTLOOK: Persistent economic woes dampen Asia chemical freight demand By Hwee Hwee Tan 02-Jul-24 12:03 SINGAPORE (ICIS)–Asia’s chemical freight demand is dampened as macroeconomic doldrums were pulling back spot trades well into the third quarter despite reducing plant capacity losses for key liquid bulk products.

08-Jul-2024

Hurricane Beryl strengthens and shifts path, expected to hit Texas’ Corpus Christi

SAO PAULO (ICIS)–Hurricane Beryl is expected to post a “slow re-intensification” as it heads towards the north and could potentially hit Texas’ industrial hub of Corpus Christi by Monday. On 4 July, the US National Hurricane Center had said Beryl had weakened from a category 5 hurricane to a category 3 and was expected to become a storm thereafter. However, on Friday, as the Hurricane brought havoc to Yucatan, the NHC said it could strengthen again once it hits sea waters, making it stronger as it heads to make another landfall in Texas. “Beryl is expected to emerge over the southwestern Gulf of Mexico tonight and then move northwestward toward northeastern Mexico and southern Texas by the end of the weekend,” said the NHC on Friday morning. “Maximum sustained winds have decreased to near 85 mph (140 km/h) with higher gusts. Continued rapid weakening is expected as Beryl moves farther inland and crosses the Yucatan Peninsula today, but slow re-intensification is expected once Beryl moves back over the Gulf of Mexico.” Moreover, the Houston area – an eight-million-strong metropolitan area – could also now be subject to a significant impact, although analysts at Space City Weather said on Friday the impact “will be mostly manageable locally”. PETROCHEMICALS, ENERGYWhile the Altamira petrochemicals hub in the Mexican state of Tamaulipas was spare from the worse, industrial assets in Texas may not have the same luck. The current pathway projected by the NHC implies that Beryl would make landfall in Texas right in the Corpus Christi area, where major refining and petrochemical assets are located. In addition to being a refining and petrochemical hub, Corpus Christi is a major oil-exporting port and hosts a terminal that exports liquefied natural gas (LNG). If Beryl finally disrupts US LNG exports, that could have a knock-on effect on petrochemical prices by shutting down one of the eight LNG export terminals in the country. If the disruption lasted long enough, prices for natural gas would fall. Lower gas prices would drag down those for ethane, the main feedstock that US crackers use to produce ethylene. Petrochemical producers could benefit from lower feedstock costs. Meanwhile, as Beryl strengthens again, energy companies in Texas may choose to shut their plants as a precaution, as well as oil and gas wells in the Gulf of Mexico. Major US oil and liquefied natural gas (LNG) ports could also be touched by Beryl now, which could potentially cause major disruption in supplies. THE WEEKEND IS KEYSpace City Weather said that where Beryl ultimately makes landfall will depend on how far the high-pressure system is over the southern US retreats. The landfall location is “complicated by the contour of the South Texas coastline, which is very nearly north-south relative” to the Gulf of Mexico. “Regarding Houston, I would love to be able to tell you with certainty that Beryl will make landfall near or south of Corpus Christi. I truly think that will be the case. But as Beryl’s track has moved significantly in the last 24 hours that is not something I can guarantee you,” concluded analyst Eric Berger. Source: US National Hurricane Center

05-Jul-2024

Four Asia chemical majors in consortium to build green polyester supply chain

SINGAPORE (ICIS)–A consortium consisting of four Asian petrochemical producers have agreed to establish a sustainable polyester fiber supply chain. Japan's Mitsubishi Corp, South Korea’s SK geo centric, Thailand’s Indorama Ventures Ltd (IVL), and India Glycols along with three other companies are part of the consortium, the companies said in a joint statement on Thursday. Japanese sports apparel firm Goldwin is the project owner of the initiative, while Finnish refiner Neste is also part of the consortium alongside Japan-based engineering firm Chiyoda Corp. Financial details of the project were not disclosed. The project aims to utilize renewable and bio-based materials as well as materials produced via carbon capture and utilization (CCU) to manufacture polyester fibers for THE NORTH FACE brand in Japan. Outdoor apparel and equipment brand THE NORTH FACE is operated by Goldwin in Japan. "After that, the launch of further products and brands of Goldwin will be considered," Chiyoda said in the statement. The polyester fiber produced from the project is planned to be used by Goldwin for a part of THE NORTH FACE products, including sports uniforms in July this year. Chiyoda will supply CCU-based paraxylene (PX) to the supply chain, while Thai polyester producer IVL will contribute renewable CCU-based purified terephthalic acid (PTA). In March 2022, Chiyoda started producing carbon dioxide (CO2)-based PX at its pilot plant at the company's Koyasu Research Park in Kanagawa prefecture as part of a project linked with Japan's New Energy and Industrial Technology Development Organization (NED). SK geo centric and Neste will be supplying renewable PX and renewable naphtha, respectively. India Glycols, which produces monoethylene glycol (MEG), will supply bio-ethylene glycol made mainly from sugarcane. Toyobo MC Corporation (TMC) – a joint venture between Toyobo Co and Mitsubishi Corp – will be supplying renewable bio-CCU polyethylene terephthalate (PET). Details on supply volumes from each of the consortium partners were not disclosed. Thumbnail photo: A generic polyester clothing label (Sandvik/imageBROKER/Shutterstock)

04-Jul-2024

Hurricane Beryl on track to make landfall near US, Mexico border

HOUSTON (ICIS)–Hurricane Beryl is on track to make landfall on Monday near the border of Mexico and the US on the Gulf Coast, although the path could change in the next few days. If Beryl holds to its forecasted path, it would spare the major refining and petrochemical hubs in the US and Mexico. In addition, few if any energy companies may choose to shut in US oil and gas wells in the Gulf of Mexico. Major US oil and LNG ports would escape the worst of the storm. The following map shows the forecasts path of Hurricane Beryl as of midday on Wednesday. The forecasted path puts Hurricane Beryl between the Mexican petrochemical hub of Altamira, Tamaulipas state and the US hub of Corpus Christi, Texas state. IF BERYL CHANGES COURSE, IT COULD THREATEN CORPUS CHRISTIIn addition to being a refining and petrochemical hub, Corpus Christi is a major oil-exporting port and hosts a terminal that exports liquefied natural gas (LNG). Were a storm to disrupt US LNG exports, it would have a knock-on effect on petrochemical prices by shutting down one of the eight LNG export terminals in the country. If the disruption lasted long enough, prices for natural gas would fall. Lower gas prices would drag down those for ethane, the main feedstock that US crackers use to produce ethylene. Petrochemical producers could benefit from lower feedstock costs. UPDATE ON HURRICANE BERYLHurricane Beryl is the first Category 5 hurricane to form so early in the season. Category 5 hurricanes have the strongest winds under the Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Wind Scale, with speeds exceeding 157 miles/hour (253 km/hour). Beryl is near Jamaica and it should weaken as it approaches the Yucatan peninsula in Mexico, where it should make landfall on Friday. It will cross the peninsula, enter the Bay of Campeche and remain north of the Mexican state of Veracruz, which is home to the petrochemical hub of Coatzacoalcos and the Ethylene XXI integrated polyethylene (PE) complex. It will swing north before making another landfall near Brownsville, Texas state and Matamoros, Tamaulipas state. BUSY HURRICANE SEASONMeteorologists have warned that this year's hurricane season could be the most active ever, with 17-25 named storms. Out of those, 8-13 should be hurricanes and 4-7 should be major hurricanes. Major hurricanes are Category 3-5 storms with wind speeds of at least 111 miles/hour.

03-Jul-2024

Brazil’s Braskem still facing logistical woes at Triunfo facilities

RIO DE JANEIRO (ICIS)–Brazil’s polymers major Braskem is still facing some logistical challenges at its facilities in Triunfo, in the floods-hit state of Rio Grande do Sul, according to a letter to customers seen by ICIS. Braskem was forced to shut down its Triunfo facilities after the severe flooding which affected the state in May. By the beginning of June, the producer said it hoped its operations would return to normality in a few days, according to a spokesperson in a written response to ICIS. However, according to the letter to customers, dated 28 June, Braskem’s operations at Triunfo are yet to return to normality, mostly due to logistical woes as many roads and key port operations at the Brazilian state were hit by the aftermath of the floods. “Specific challenges resulting from force majeure still persist in some logistics modes, leading to the partial receipt of inputs for the production of products derived from ethanol and green ethylene,” said the letter. “At the moment, there is no risk of interruption in the supply of these products, and we are implementing alternatives to return availability to normal levels.” At the end of June, an analyst said to ICIS most of the roads in Rio do Grande do Sul had reopened, although some of them were operating at reduced capacity. The Port of Porto Alegre, the largest city in the state and close to the Triunfo petrochemicals hub, only reopened in mid-June. TRIUNFO KEY FOR PLASTICS Braskem is Brazil’s sole manufacturer of polyethylene (PE) and polypropylene (PP), the most widely used polymers. Its market share in 2023 for PE stood at 56% and for PP at 70%, according to figures from the ICIS Supply & Demand database. The Triunfo complex, meanwhile, is key for the country’s polymers supply chain, accounting for nearly 37% of Brazil’s PP capacity and 40% of PE capacity. Brazil’s total PP production capacity is nearly 2 million tonnes/year. PE capacity is about 3 million tonnes/year, with 41% being high-density polyethylene (HDPE), 33% being linear low-density polyethylene (LLDPE) and 26% being low-density polyethylene (LDPE). Braskem’s Triunfo complex can produce 740,000 tonnes/year of PP, 550,000 tonnes/year of HDPE, 385,000 tonnes/year of LDPE and 300,000 tonnes/year of LLDPE. Additional reporting by Jonathan Lopez 

03-Jul-2024

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